The Trinitarian Story in 100 Words or Less

From the Triune God comes a narrative centering on Christ, God’s incarnate Son, and supernaturally recorded in Scripture. This story begins with creation, reports humanity’s fall, Israel’s history, and God’s redemption in Jesus, the Messiah. People, who by the Spirit’s power repent and believe this good news, experience salvation: deliverance from sin, Satan, and death. United with the crucified and resurrected Lord, believers participate in Christ’s Body, the eschatological community that worships God, serves a needy world, and provisionally embodies God’s coming Kingdom. This blessing is for the whole creation, which will soon be judged and renewed for God’s glory.

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2 thoughts on “The Trinitarian Story in 100 Words or Less

  1. this is a great excercise because it forces you to narrow down to what you deem the most important parts of the Story . what stays and what goes? it causes the writer to think through all of Scripture in a concise fashion.

  2. […] This reminds of an exercise I had to do in college, which was writing the story of the Bible in 200 words or less.  The professor that assigned that exercise wrote up the story of Scripture a few years ago in 100 words or less, and I it accomplishes something similar to what Dane Ortlund’s question does.  Here’s what he wrote: From the Triune God comes a narrative centering on Christ, God’s incarnate Son, and supernaturally recorded in Scripture. This story begins with creation, reports humanity’s fall, Israel’s history, and God’s redemption in Jesus, the Messiah. People, who by the Spirit’s power repent and believe this good news, experience salvation: deliverance from sin, Satan, and death. United with the crucified and resurrected Lord, believers participate in Christ’s Body, the eschatological community that worships God, serves a needy world, and provisionally embodies God’s coming Kingdom. This blessing is for the whole creation, which will soon be judged and renewed for God’s glory. [The Trinitarian Story in 100 Words or Less] […]

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